References

PATIENT | HOME

1. Cooper J, O’Connor B, Watanabe R, Fuerst R, Berger S, Eisenberg N, Dillehay SM. (2018). Case series analysis of myopic progression control with a unique extended depth of focus multifocal contact lens. Eye & Contact Lens, 4(5): e16- e24.doi:10.1097/ICL.0000000000000440

 

PATIENT | MULTIFOCAL PRESBYOPIA TREATMENT

1. VTI Data on file, 2015. N=59. Data assessed after 1 week of wear. Respondents were asked what mode of vision was preferred vs. habitual correction type. Of those who expressed a preference of mode of vision, 79%preferred NVMF vs. select tested brands.
2. Bailey, G. (2017, August). Presbyopia. Retrieved January 16, 2018, from
http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/presbyopia.htm
3. VTI Date on file, 2015. N=59. Data assessed after 1 week of wear. Subjective visual ratings based on a scale of 0-lOOm O=Extremely poor/cannot perform, 100-Extremely good/No problems. All values statistically significant p</=0.05. Preference based on those who expressed a preference among brands tested.

 

PATIENT | MULTIFOCAL MYOPIA TREATMENT

1. Cooper J, O’Connor B, Watanabe R, Fuerst R, Berger S, Eisenberg N, Dillehay SM. Case series analysis of myopic progression control with a unique extended depth of focus multifocal contact lens. Eye & Contact Lens. 2018;4(5):e 16-e24.
2. Gifford P, Gifford KL. The Future of Myopia Control Contact Lenses. Optometry and Vision Science.
2016;93(4):336-343.
3. Flitcroft D. The complex interactions of retinal, optical and environmental factors in myopia aetiology. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research. 2012;31(6):622-660.